Quilt shop worker finds joy, peace in creativity

Becky McCoy, shop manager, has been at Quilting Is My Therapy in Liberty for three years. She started out cutting squares for the fat-square bundles and then stepped into role of cashier. She also runs the two long-arm quilting machines in the store.

LIBERTY — On Saturday, June 15, Angela Walters will be offering talks on contemporary quilts at First Presbyterian Church. Walters’ business, Quilting Is My Therapy, most likely will be a busy place as Saturday marks the second Annual Quilt Walk. The store team, led by Becky McCoy, will be greeting customers.

She has been with the store for three years.

“In many ways, I represent the front of the house,” she said. “Angela is so busy and works on her various YouTube shows or is traveling to teach quilting. We are part of this store family, including my two daughters.”

What would surprise people most to learn about your job?

Some of her responsibilities are the overall look of the store. McCoy likes to move around the store and the decorative quilts that hang on the walls. She also tends to serve as cashier.“We are helping people from all over,” McCoy said. “I would guess that about 50 percent of our customers are local, but the rest are from all over. We get customers from Canada, Delaware, New York, Texas, Florida … Those folks who stop at Missouri Star in Hamilton often make us a stop and vice versa. We have even had customers from Alaska.”

What do you like best about your position or this field in particular?

“My favorite part of my job is the long-arm, computerized machines,” McCoy said. “It’s putting these pieces on a machine and by the end, it’s quilted and looks incredible. My absolute favorite is when a customer comes in and allows me to pick the thread colors and the design for the quilt. The binding is all that remains once the quilts come off the machine. I know about 50 percent of the quilts will be a gift and I have a moment of pride that I had a hand in that.”

Would 10-year-old you be surprised that you are in this field or position?

“Yes, 10-year-old me would be flabbergasted,” the store team leader said. “I was going to be a teacher and went to school to be one, but I realized I needed a creative outlet. I feel out of sorts if I don’t create. It was a winding route to get here. I’ve been quilting since 2007 and made gifts for church friends. Then I found Quilting Is My Therapy and Angela. She’s good at seeing the best in people and speaking positivity into them.”

What’s the most

common question you get asked about what you do?

“It’s not really about me per se, but whether or not Angela is in the store on a specific day,” McCoy said. “With the build-a-quilt block of the month, there are always questions. We have about 900 people participating and that is a lot of people. I help administrate that site as well as the long-arm support group. We try to answer questions as quick and as best we can.”“It’s not really about me per se, but whether or not Angela is in the store on a specific day,” McCoy said. “With the build-a-quilt block of the month, there are always questions. We have about 900 people participating and that is a lot of people. I help administrate that site as well as the long-arm support group. We try to answer questions as quick and as best we can.”“I’m a people pleaser,” she said. “Like Angela says, this should be a happy place that is cheerful and lacks drama. I want everyone who comes here to have some fun. I don’t want people to have a bad experience that turns them off of quilting. It’s too much fun.”

What is the most

challenging aspect

of your job?

“Like Angela says, this should be a happy place that is cheerful and lacks drama. I want everyone who comes here to have some fun. I don’t want people to have a bad experience that turns them off of quilting. It’s too much fun,” McCoy said.

What advice would you give someone who is starting a job similar to yours?

“Any job is largely about its people,” McCoy said. “It’s awesome to find a piece of fabric to love and let that one guide you, but it’s finding people, both at work and those who support your hobby and art, that really matters.”

Southeast Editor Kellie Houx can be reached at kellie.houx@mycouriertribune.com or 389-6630.

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