Watch for deer

Although deer strikes can occur at any time, most occur during between 6 and 6:59 a.m. and 6 to 6:59 p.m. Last year, drivers in Missouri experienced 4,320 traffic crashes where deer-vehicle strikes occurred. One deer strike occurred every two hours in the state. In these crashes, there were nine fatalities and 449 people injured.

Col. Eric T. Olson, superintendent of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, reminds drivers that deer are more active and create hazards for Missouri motorists this time of year.

“Deer behavior changes due to mating season, which may cause an increase in sightings and roadway crossings. Hunting and crop harvesting may result in these animals being in places they aren’t usually seen. Drivers are urged to remain alert,” states a release.

If a driver strikes a deer, they are urged to call 911 or *55 on a cell phone and report it.

Last year, drivers in Missouri experienced 4,320 traffic crashes where deer-vehicle strikes occurred. One deer strike occurred every two hours in the state. In these crashes, there were nine fatalities and 449 people injured. The majority of deer strike crashes occur in October and November each year, with the largest number taking place in November. Although deer strikes can occur at any time, most occur during between 6 and 6:59 a.m. and 6 to 6:59 p.m.

Drivers in urban areas of the state should watch for deer as well.

“When you see a deer, slow down and proceed with caution. Deer often travel in groups. Stay on guard after a close call or when you see a single deer,” states the release. “Natural features also affect deer movement. In areas where there are streams or wooded corridors surrounded by farmland, look for more deer to cross roadways. At night, watch for deer eyes to reflect your headlights, which could give you more time to react to their presence.”

Drivers are reminded that an attempt to avoid striking a deer could result in a more serious crash involving oncoming traffic.

“As soon as you see a deer, the best course of action is to reduce your speed. Other drivers may be doing the same, so be sure to pay attention to traffic patterns and always wear your seat belt,” states the release.

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