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Here is a brown trout caught by Matthew Taylor and his father Shawn Taylor in the North Fork of the White River near Tecumseh, MO. The upcoming art event teaches how to distinguish between the browns and the rainbow. 

On Saturday, June 19, people can use a paint brush to learn the differences between rainbow and brown trout, according to a release from the Missouri Department of Conservation. 

On this date, people can use their artistic skills to learn more about these two popular sportfish species at the MDC virtual program “Nature Art: Fishy Fantasy Painting.” This free online program will be from 5:30-7 p.m. and is being put on by the staff of MDC’s Shepherd of the Hills Conservation Center in Branson.

This program is open to all ages 6 and up. People can register at: mdc-event-web.s3licensing.com/Event/EventDetails/178067

No painting experience or expertise is necessary for this event. MDC’s Shepherd of the Hills Conservation Center Volunteer Gala Keller will guide participants through this virtual “art class” and, along the way, will also provide some fun fish facts about how to identify these species, both of which are found in Missouri.

Participants need to furnish their own supplies, but the equipment list – like the painting techniques Keller will use – are basic and simple, according to the release. 

Though this June 19 program is free, registration is required to participate using the link above. Registrants must provide an e-mail, so a program link and a supply list can be sent to them.

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